Tuesday, April 21, 2009

ABOUT 'AMERICAN MASTERS'

Greetings Readers,

Sorry for the delay in getting this up and running but I have been busy putting the finishing touches on my new book. 'American Masters' is a book for those who love books. It is a popular history of American literature from its beginning in our colonial period (Cotton Mather and Benjamin Franklin), through our most recent Nobel Prize winner Toni Morrison. It is written in a sweeping narrative style (with a hidden first person narrator), drawing from the lives of the authors, their stories, their work, and interesting anecdotes from their own experiences. Did you know, for instance, that at age six Flannery O'Connor taught a chicken to walk backward. It was filmed by the Pathe News and was shown across the country. Little Mary O'Connor was on film helping with her chicken. She claimed that everything else in her life was anti-climactic. This is only one of the many such stories that have turned up in the research for this book. (And it has been just a plain ol' hoot to write, if you'll allow me that levity).

The study of literature has somehow become divided up by particular authors or poets, or various 'movements', or by their individual works. Very little has been done to mine the vast interconnectedness of the literary tradition from its earliest days until the present. Yet, not surprisingly, these authors knew each other, or had read each other, or had written reviews about each other, or had made comments about each other, and nothing was ever written in a vacuum as it sometimes appears in the classroom. Readers, (myself included), have approached the whole affair of reading our masters as a hit and miss matter, which seems to be more often miss than hit.

'American Masters' has a strong narrative insistence which does not sacrifice itself by use of obvious fictional techniques. Rather, it is written on several levels, giving it a deep tidal flow that is not fully appreciated by only a surface reading. Beyond the simple chronological reading there is a deeper symbolic level; and a deeper still mythic historicity of dreams, fears, imaginings; and a deeper still labyrinthine level of games, puzzles, codes, word play, and so on. (Which could be appreciated by the likes of Nabokov). 'American Masters' is going to need a respected agency to represent it for publication. If you know of one that might be interested, please blog me back and let me know.

Thanks, and good reading...

James D. Sanderson

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